Monthly Archives:February 2019

A decade ago, five-time British Open Champion Tom Watson was one of the headline acts on his last visit to this part of the world for the Australian Masters and we questioned, at his then age of 53, if his appearance was purely ceremonial.
苏州美甲学校

He bristled at the suggestion. “What am I? 44-1. I’d be worth a few dollars,” he said with a smile. Well, actually he was paying $51, but those who took his advice did their money. With rounds of 73-77-70-74 he finished tied 46th behind Peter Lonard, who beat Gavin Coles and Adam Scott in a play-off.

Now, the 63-year-old Watson will surely be asked the same question when he arrives for the Australian Open at The Lakes in early December.

Almost certainly appearance money has changed hands, so is Golf Australia banking on the nostalgia factor or can he genuinely contend for the title he won at Royal Melbourne back in 1984? He would be prohibitive odds to make the cut, and rightfully so.

Three years ago, at Turnberry, Watson nearly won a sixth British Open to equal the legendary Harry Vardon. He missed a three-metre putt on the 72nd hole and was then beaten in a four-hole play-off by Stewart Cink. This year at Royal Lytham and St Anne’s he made his 35th cut in the open but eventually finished tied 77th.

At The Lakes, I would not dismiss him from calculations. His swing is as sweet as ever and the course measures 6264 metres, far shorter than championship layouts these days, so Watson would not be seriously disadvantaged against the younger brigade.

So, call his visit ceremonial at your peril and also marvel at an ageless, gracious champion of the past, maybe even the present.

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

The drip feed of player announcements for our major tournaments this summer has started with last year’s US Masters winner, South African Charl Schwartzel, and American Jason Dufner announced for the $2 million Perth International at Lake Karrinyup next month, and former US Open champion Graeme McDowell and defending champion Ian Poulter confirmed for the Australian Masters. Adam Scott is playing in Perth plus at the Masters and the Open, while Greg Chalmers is defending both the Open and PGA, events that Geoff Ogilvy will also contest. Greg Norman has played the Open for the past three years as part of his contract with Destination NSW and while his association with the state government’s tourism arm continues, he will not be playing in the Open, but rather the Shark Shootout in the US due to a clash of dates. Norman will, though, be at Coolum for the PGA Championship.

THE $100 MILLION MAN

The first cheque Jack Nicklaus ever won as a professional golfer, $33.33 for tied 50th in the 1962 Los Angeles Open, was never cashed and is mounted in a display case in the Jack Nicklaus Museum in Columbus, Ohio, but apparently Tiger Woods didn’t keep his first pay cheque for posterity. It was for tied 60th in the Greater Milwaukee Open in September 1996 and how his fortune has amassed since then. Last weekend, Woods finished tied third behind Rory McIlroy in the Deutsche Bank Championship in Boston and his cheque for $US544,000 ($526,375) took him past the $US100 million mark. The PGA Tour stats department tells us it took Woods 277 tournaments to accumulate that amount, averaging $US362,276 in each event, while Sam Snead who won 82 tournaments, eight more that Woods’s 74, collected a total of $US820,000 in his career that spanned from 1937 until 1979.

PLAYING FAVOURITES

Next week is the final women’s major of the year, the Women’s British Open at Royal Liverpool, and seven Australians are exempt – Karrie Webb, Katherine Hull, Rebecca Artis, Stacey Keating, Karen Lunn, Sarah-Jane Smith and Lindsey Wright. If an Australian doesn’t win, and that is looking at it parochially, may it be two who we’d regard as honorary Aussies – Laura Davies, who seems to regard our country as a second home, or 15-year-old Kiwi Lydia Ko, who just a few weeks ago became the youngest winner of an LPGA event.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲学校.

Champion hoop Greg Ryan and owner-trainer Graham Payne are poised for revenge with Kinetics in today’s $25,000 Black Nugget Cup (1600 metres) at Mudgee. The gelding has won nine times and finished a close second to Pesci in last year’s event. Kinetics is coming off a fifth to Poor Judge in the Moree Cup but Payne said forget the run. Previously, the six-year-old scored at Scone and four starts back won the Wauchope Cup. Meanwhile, Moruya hold a seven-race meeting today featuring the $20,000 Club Keno Cup and $17,000 Stayers Cup.
苏州美甲学校

BOOKIES HIT FOR SIX

A group of first-time owners and members of the Ganmain Cricket Club left bookmakers reeling at Parkes last Saturday following the win of A Little Alert. Ganmain is a small town near Wagga noted for its chaff production. The 13 owners unleashed on the Brad Witt-trained debutante, backing her from $3.20 into $1.50 favouritism. The group hit just about every bagman, one bookmaker’s last bet was $500 at $1.30. Ridden by Joel Maconachie, the daughter of Alert and Aurora Blue strolled home in the 800m maiden by two lengths much to the cricketers’ delight.

RARE FEAT BY PHILLIPS

South coast jockey Tim Phillips joined the likes of Athol Mulley, Greg Ryan, Len Harris, Graeme Birney, Bill Aspros and Doug Weir when he rode the entire program at Marthaguy picnics held at Quambone last Saturday. Phillips, 39, won the five-race card on She’s A Cutie, Maximum Vision, Spinning Yarns, the Quambone Picnic Cup on Orbit and King Con, all at short odds. The last of the 47 jockeys to achieve the feat was Greg Ryan at Parkes on August 26, 2006.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Reader David Kelley from Cooma makes a valid point in regards to programming and community race clubs. “Old-timers point to paddocks around the Monaro district and talk about race meetings held there years ago, more recently Cooma, Bombala and Adaminaby had multiple meetings, which have now been whittled back to one meeting each a year each. In recent years, field sizes have been an issue but the biggest problem has been attracting enough jockeys, a case in point was at Cooma two meetings ago when horses had to be scratched because there were no jockeys to ride them. And the reason I primarily write to you now – the Gundagai three-day carnival over a Thursday, Friday and Saturday in November each year – has this year been moved and clashes with the once-a-year meeting at Adaminaby. On a geographical issue and logistics in this area, I can assure you Gundagai will take horses, and particularly jockeys, away from Adaminaby. Why do programmers not consider this when setting dates? It has occurred previously here where Cooma and Bombala have a once-a-year meeting scheduled only to have nearby Queanbeyan and Canberra have a meeting the day before or in such proximity. The three small clubs mentioned all have voluntary committees who work hard to give the community racing. If country racing keeps stepping backwards at such a rate as it has in the last 20 years, there will be more paddocks where race meetings used to be held.”

TAB meetings: Today – Moruya, Mudgee. Monday – Albury, Coffs Harbour. Tuesday – Queanbeyan, Tamworth. Friday – Ballina, Canberra. Saturday – Armidale.

[email protected]苏州美甲学校

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲学校.

STUART MACGILL is set to retire from cricket once and for all after being offered a paltry $20,000 contract with the Sydney Sixers.
苏州美甲学校

While some critics questioned whether MacGill was past it, the former Australian leg-spinner proved the doubters wrong when he returned from retirement to play in the inaugural Big Bash League.

At the age of 41, MacGill was one of the tournament’s best-performing bowlers, snaring seven wickets at an average of 23.7 with an economy rate of just 6.64.

But rather than rewarding him with a better deal, Sixers management is believed to have again tabled the minimum contract permissible. While a $1 million salary cap the amount the squad can earn, MacGill’s offer was a fraction of what some of his teammates were offered. Third-party arrangements are permissible to top up payments, but it is understood the Sixers did not source any for MacGill.

He is juggling several other professional commitments, including a consumer insights position at advertising agency Razor Group and new roles with Google Plus and YouTube. A six-week sabbatical to play cricket, at the minimum wage, could potentially jeopardise those deals.

While the big turner has not provided officials with a definitive decision, sources close to MacGill have told The Sun-Herald he won’t play in the Big Bash League this year. The development also clouds his involvement in the Champions League in South Africa.

”He clearly still has it, he dismissed the best batsman in the competition last year,” a source said. ”I can’t believe they didn’t make him a priority signing.”

Attempts to contact MacGill for comment were unsuccessful.

While many predicted the Twenty20 format would sound the death knell for slow bowlers, MacGill and Melbourne Stars drawcard Shane Warne proved there is room in the game for experienced wrist-spinners. MacGill, who took 208 Test wickets at an average of 29.02, finished with slightly better figures than the ”Sheik of Tweak” last year.

Having already signed stars David Warner, Brad Haddin, Brett Lee, Stephen O’Keefe, Steve Smith and Mitchell Starc, the Sixers roster is almost complete.

Twitter – @proshenks

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲学校.

AFTER a winter headlined by the defections of Phillip Hughes and Usman Khawaja, NSW are set to give wicketkeeper Peter Nevill a shock promotion to the top of the batting order.
苏州美甲学校

The bold move will enable the Blues to play glovemen Nevill and Brad Haddin in the same XI while also adding vital experience to a top order decimated by retirements and player movements. Youngsters Nic Maddinson and Scott Henry, who has played two first-class matches, are also in contention for top-order berths for the season-opening Sheffield Shield game against Western Australia starting Tuesday week.

NSW and the Warriors have been handed an unusually early start to their season, especially considering the bulk of their squads will be representing Sydney Sixers and Perth Scorchers in the Champions League Twenty20 tournament next month. Although asking Nevill to open the batting seems on paper an unorthodox strategy, the Melbourne-born player topped NSW’s run-scoring last summer with 570 at an average of 50 and was one of few Blues to emerge from the season with his reputation enhanced. Nevill toured the West Indies as the Test back-up keeper to Matthew Wade earlier this year and is highly rated within the NSW dressing room.

”When he bats in the middle order he’s had to face the second new ball a lot,” said Stephen O’Keefe, who will skipper the side when Michael Clarke is unavailable. ”He was probably our best batter last year. Technically he’s very sound. I’d like to think of him as a bloke that could bat anywhere from one to six and I’d like to think we can fit him into our batting line-up, even with Brad Haddin in the side.”

The Blues begin their domestic campaign next Sunday in Perth – where last season, despite fielding eight players with international experience, they posted one of the worst performances in the state’s history. ”It really ripped the band-aid off last year,” O’Keefe said. ”It exposed a few issues that we had to address as a squad.”

Stalwarts Simon Katich and Phil Jaques called time on their illustrious careers shortly after and there was more upheaval in the winter when Khawaja and Hughes also departed, for Queensland and South Australia respectively. The Blues will be led in Perth by Clarke, who takes over a side that has done much retrospection after their disappointing campaign last summer. Anthony Stuart remains coach despite much speculation he had lost support within the dressing room and would not see out the full term of his two-year deal.

O’Keefe said it was unfair Stuart had taken the brunt of the blame for NSW’s failure. ”Ultimately the players have to point the fingers at themselves,” O’Keefe said. ”If we look back at everything a lot of the responsibility comes back to us as a player and a group. If we’ve got issues there’s nothing wrong with voicing them or getting out and speaking our mind as opposed to having conversations in alleyways and not expressing our thoughts. This year we have the ability to have that tough conversation and bring up areas we feel like we needed to improve on. Credit to Anthony, he’s worked bloody hard with the squad.”

Shane Watson and David Warner are unavailable for the start of the Blues’ season due to international commitments, as are young guns Pat Cummins and Mitchell Starc. The Blues will still field a strong pace attack likely to include rising star Josh Hazlewood, Trent Copeland and Doug Bollinger.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲学校.

JUNIOR Warriors coach John Ackland has shaken off the responsibility of being the club’s only representative in play-off football this season.
苏州美甲学校

The Warriors under-20s finished second to the Bulldogs on this year’s National Youth Competition table, and will play the Raiders, who finished third, in Canberra today.

The side is bidding to claim its third straight under-20s title, but Ackland, who guided the Warriors to their 2010 and 2011 triumphs, said they were not feeling any heat.

The Warriors first-grade side, and the Auckland Vulcans, the club’s NSW Cup feeder team, missed out on their respective top eights after poor seasons.

”I don’t know about pressure,” Ackland said. ”We’re still playing, so perhaps it’s given some people something to watch for a little bit longer. I wouldn’t like to think there’s any pressure on us. The boys have done very, very well, really. We’ve played a lot of games with four or five that are going to be able to play for three years.

”We’ve battled some injuries to some of our key guys, so for them to finish first equal [on points] after 26 weeks is a fantastic effort, really.”

Because of the lack of a Warriors first-grade home semi-final, the under-20s must travel to Canberra despite finishing above their opponents, who they beat 26-12 last weekend, on the table.

Ackland is not complaining, however. ”If you want to win [it], you’ve got to win in Australia, that’s the bottom line.

”We’re looking forward to playing in the semi-final. The boys are all keen. We’d play them in a car park if we had to. If we do what we do well, and we stick to what works for us, we’ll be very hard to beat.”

NRL rookie Carlos Tuimavave will return to the under-20s for their play-off campaign, after making five first-grade appearances at fullback late in the season, because of the absence of the injured Kevin Locke.

Ackland said his presence will be welcomed by the junior Warriors.

”He can take a lot of confidence out of the way he played for first grade,” Ackland said.

”I thought he acquitted himself very well in the games that he played, in a tough situation and playing in a position he hadn’t played in a long time. It’s … good to have him back.”

”I think a lot of teams, at this time of year, are playing guys that have had some first-grade experience. I don’t think there’s such a thing as a secret weapon in the competition because everything’s on film and everything gets watched ad nauseam.”

”[But] he’s a good player and brings a lot of experience to the team. He’s played in two semi-final campaigns, so I’m just hoping he can lift it for us.”

Tuimavave will play at five-eighth for the Junior Warriors today, while Peter Hiku is likely to wear the No.1 jumper.

Twitter – @benstanleyffx

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲学校.