Category Archive:南京桑拿荤场

A decade ago, five-time British Open Champion Tom Watson was one of the headline acts on his last visit to this part of the world for the Australian Masters and we questioned, at his then age of 53, if his appearance was purely ceremonial.
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He bristled at the suggestion. “What am I? 44-1. I’d be worth a few dollars,” he said with a smile. Well, actually he was paying $51, but those who took his advice did their money. With rounds of 73-77-70-74 he finished tied 46th behind Peter Lonard, who beat Gavin Coles and Adam Scott in a play-off.

Now, the 63-year-old Watson will surely be asked the same question when he arrives for the Australian Open at The Lakes in early December.

Almost certainly appearance money has changed hands, so is Golf Australia banking on the nostalgia factor or can he genuinely contend for the title he won at Royal Melbourne back in 1984? He would be prohibitive odds to make the cut, and rightfully so.

Three years ago, at Turnberry, Watson nearly won a sixth British Open to equal the legendary Harry Vardon. He missed a three-metre putt on the 72nd hole and was then beaten in a four-hole play-off by Stewart Cink. This year at Royal Lytham and St Anne’s he made his 35th cut in the open but eventually finished tied 77th.

At The Lakes, I would not dismiss him from calculations. His swing is as sweet as ever and the course measures 6264 metres, far shorter than championship layouts these days, so Watson would not be seriously disadvantaged against the younger brigade.

So, call his visit ceremonial at your peril and also marvel at an ageless, gracious champion of the past, maybe even the present.

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

The drip feed of player announcements for our major tournaments this summer has started with last year’s US Masters winner, South African Charl Schwartzel, and American Jason Dufner announced for the $2 million Perth International at Lake Karrinyup next month, and former US Open champion Graeme McDowell and defending champion Ian Poulter confirmed for the Australian Masters. Adam Scott is playing in Perth plus at the Masters and the Open, while Greg Chalmers is defending both the Open and PGA, events that Geoff Ogilvy will also contest. Greg Norman has played the Open for the past three years as part of his contract with Destination NSW and while his association with the state government’s tourism arm continues, he will not be playing in the Open, but rather the Shark Shootout in the US due to a clash of dates. Norman will, though, be at Coolum for the PGA Championship.

THE $100 MILLION MAN

The first cheque Jack Nicklaus ever won as a professional golfer, $33.33 for tied 50th in the 1962 Los Angeles Open, was never cashed and is mounted in a display case in the Jack Nicklaus Museum in Columbus, Ohio, but apparently Tiger Woods didn’t keep his first pay cheque for posterity. It was for tied 60th in the Greater Milwaukee Open in September 1996 and how his fortune has amassed since then. Last weekend, Woods finished tied third behind Rory McIlroy in the Deutsche Bank Championship in Boston and his cheque for $US544,000 ($526,375) took him past the $US100 million mark. The PGA Tour stats department tells us it took Woods 277 tournaments to accumulate that amount, averaging $US362,276 in each event, while Sam Snead who won 82 tournaments, eight more that Woods’s 74, collected a total of $US820,000 in his career that spanned from 1937 until 1979.

PLAYING FAVOURITES

Next week is the final women’s major of the year, the Women’s British Open at Royal Liverpool, and seven Australians are exempt – Karrie Webb, Katherine Hull, Rebecca Artis, Stacey Keating, Karen Lunn, Sarah-Jane Smith and Lindsey Wright. If an Australian doesn’t win, and that is looking at it parochially, may it be two who we’d regard as honorary Aussies – Laura Davies, who seems to regard our country as a second home, or 15-year-old Kiwi Lydia Ko, who just a few weeks ago became the youngest winner of an LPGA event.

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Champion hoop Greg Ryan and owner-trainer Graham Payne are poised for revenge with Kinetics in today’s $25,000 Black Nugget Cup (1600 metres) at Mudgee. The gelding has won nine times and finished a close second to Pesci in last year’s event. Kinetics is coming off a fifth to Poor Judge in the Moree Cup but Payne said forget the run. Previously, the six-year-old scored at Scone and four starts back won the Wauchope Cup. Meanwhile, Moruya hold a seven-race meeting today featuring the $20,000 Club Keno Cup and $17,000 Stayers Cup.
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BOOKIES HIT FOR SIX

A group of first-time owners and members of the Ganmain Cricket Club left bookmakers reeling at Parkes last Saturday following the win of A Little Alert. Ganmain is a small town near Wagga noted for its chaff production. The 13 owners unleashed on the Brad Witt-trained debutante, backing her from $3.20 into $1.50 favouritism. The group hit just about every bagman, one bookmaker’s last bet was $500 at $1.30. Ridden by Joel Maconachie, the daughter of Alert and Aurora Blue strolled home in the 800m maiden by two lengths much to the cricketers’ delight.

RARE FEAT BY PHILLIPS

South coast jockey Tim Phillips joined the likes of Athol Mulley, Greg Ryan, Len Harris, Graeme Birney, Bill Aspros and Doug Weir when he rode the entire program at Marthaguy picnics held at Quambone last Saturday. Phillips, 39, won the five-race card on She’s A Cutie, Maximum Vision, Spinning Yarns, the Quambone Picnic Cup on Orbit and King Con, all at short odds. The last of the 47 jockeys to achieve the feat was Greg Ryan at Parkes on August 26, 2006.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Reader David Kelley from Cooma makes a valid point in regards to programming and community race clubs. “Old-timers point to paddocks around the Monaro district and talk about race meetings held there years ago, more recently Cooma, Bombala and Adaminaby had multiple meetings, which have now been whittled back to one meeting each a year each. In recent years, field sizes have been an issue but the biggest problem has been attracting enough jockeys, a case in point was at Cooma two meetings ago when horses had to be scratched because there were no jockeys to ride them. And the reason I primarily write to you now – the Gundagai three-day carnival over a Thursday, Friday and Saturday in November each year – has this year been moved and clashes with the once-a-year meeting at Adaminaby. On a geographical issue and logistics in this area, I can assure you Gundagai will take horses, and particularly jockeys, away from Adaminaby. Why do programmers not consider this when setting dates? It has occurred previously here where Cooma and Bombala have a once-a-year meeting scheduled only to have nearby Queanbeyan and Canberra have a meeting the day before or in such proximity. The three small clubs mentioned all have voluntary committees who work hard to give the community racing. If country racing keeps stepping backwards at such a rate as it has in the last 20 years, there will be more paddocks where race meetings used to be held.”

TAB meetings: Today – Moruya, Mudgee. Monday – Albury, Coffs Harbour. Tuesday – Queanbeyan, Tamworth. Friday – Ballina, Canberra. Saturday – Armidale.

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STUART MACGILL is set to retire from cricket once and for all after being offered a paltry $20,000 contract with the Sydney Sixers.
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While some critics questioned whether MacGill was past it, the former Australian leg-spinner proved the doubters wrong when he returned from retirement to play in the inaugural Big Bash League.

At the age of 41, MacGill was one of the tournament’s best-performing bowlers, snaring seven wickets at an average of 23.7 with an economy rate of just 6.64.

But rather than rewarding him with a better deal, Sixers management is believed to have again tabled the minimum contract permissible. While a $1 million salary cap the amount the squad can earn, MacGill’s offer was a fraction of what some of his teammates were offered. Third-party arrangements are permissible to top up payments, but it is understood the Sixers did not source any for MacGill.

He is juggling several other professional commitments, including a consumer insights position at advertising agency Razor Group and new roles with Google Plus and YouTube. A six-week sabbatical to play cricket, at the minimum wage, could potentially jeopardise those deals.

While the big turner has not provided officials with a definitive decision, sources close to MacGill have told The Sun-Herald he won’t play in the Big Bash League this year. The development also clouds his involvement in the Champions League in South Africa.

”He clearly still has it, he dismissed the best batsman in the competition last year,” a source said. ”I can’t believe they didn’t make him a priority signing.”

Attempts to contact MacGill for comment were unsuccessful.

While many predicted the Twenty20 format would sound the death knell for slow bowlers, MacGill and Melbourne Stars drawcard Shane Warne proved there is room in the game for experienced wrist-spinners. MacGill, who took 208 Test wickets at an average of 29.02, finished with slightly better figures than the ”Sheik of Tweak” last year.

Having already signed stars David Warner, Brad Haddin, Brett Lee, Stephen O’Keefe, Steve Smith and Mitchell Starc, the Sixers roster is almost complete.

Twitter – @proshenks

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AFTER a winter headlined by the defections of Phillip Hughes and Usman Khawaja, NSW are set to give wicketkeeper Peter Nevill a shock promotion to the top of the batting order.
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The bold move will enable the Blues to play glovemen Nevill and Brad Haddin in the same XI while also adding vital experience to a top order decimated by retirements and player movements. Youngsters Nic Maddinson and Scott Henry, who has played two first-class matches, are also in contention for top-order berths for the season-opening Sheffield Shield game against Western Australia starting Tuesday week.

NSW and the Warriors have been handed an unusually early start to their season, especially considering the bulk of their squads will be representing Sydney Sixers and Perth Scorchers in the Champions League Twenty20 tournament next month. Although asking Nevill to open the batting seems on paper an unorthodox strategy, the Melbourne-born player topped NSW’s run-scoring last summer with 570 at an average of 50 and was one of few Blues to emerge from the season with his reputation enhanced. Nevill toured the West Indies as the Test back-up keeper to Matthew Wade earlier this year and is highly rated within the NSW dressing room.

”When he bats in the middle order he’s had to face the second new ball a lot,” said Stephen O’Keefe, who will skipper the side when Michael Clarke is unavailable. ”He was probably our best batter last year. Technically he’s very sound. I’d like to think of him as a bloke that could bat anywhere from one to six and I’d like to think we can fit him into our batting line-up, even with Brad Haddin in the side.”

The Blues begin their domestic campaign next Sunday in Perth – where last season, despite fielding eight players with international experience, they posted one of the worst performances in the state’s history. ”It really ripped the band-aid off last year,” O’Keefe said. ”It exposed a few issues that we had to address as a squad.”

Stalwarts Simon Katich and Phil Jaques called time on their illustrious careers shortly after and there was more upheaval in the winter when Khawaja and Hughes also departed, for Queensland and South Australia respectively. The Blues will be led in Perth by Clarke, who takes over a side that has done much retrospection after their disappointing campaign last summer. Anthony Stuart remains coach despite much speculation he had lost support within the dressing room and would not see out the full term of his two-year deal.

O’Keefe said it was unfair Stuart had taken the brunt of the blame for NSW’s failure. ”Ultimately the players have to point the fingers at themselves,” O’Keefe said. ”If we look back at everything a lot of the responsibility comes back to us as a player and a group. If we’ve got issues there’s nothing wrong with voicing them or getting out and speaking our mind as opposed to having conversations in alleyways and not expressing our thoughts. This year we have the ability to have that tough conversation and bring up areas we feel like we needed to improve on. Credit to Anthony, he’s worked bloody hard with the squad.”

Shane Watson and David Warner are unavailable for the start of the Blues’ season due to international commitments, as are young guns Pat Cummins and Mitchell Starc. The Blues will still field a strong pace attack likely to include rising star Josh Hazlewood, Trent Copeland and Doug Bollinger.

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JUNIOR Warriors coach John Ackland has shaken off the responsibility of being the club’s only representative in play-off football this season.
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The Warriors under-20s finished second to the Bulldogs on this year’s National Youth Competition table, and will play the Raiders, who finished third, in Canberra today.

The side is bidding to claim its third straight under-20s title, but Ackland, who guided the Warriors to their 2010 and 2011 triumphs, said they were not feeling any heat.

The Warriors first-grade side, and the Auckland Vulcans, the club’s NSW Cup feeder team, missed out on their respective top eights after poor seasons.

”I don’t know about pressure,” Ackland said. ”We’re still playing, so perhaps it’s given some people something to watch for a little bit longer. I wouldn’t like to think there’s any pressure on us. The boys have done very, very well, really. We’ve played a lot of games with four or five that are going to be able to play for three years.

”We’ve battled some injuries to some of our key guys, so for them to finish first equal [on points] after 26 weeks is a fantastic effort, really.”

Because of the lack of a Warriors first-grade home semi-final, the under-20s must travel to Canberra despite finishing above their opponents, who they beat 26-12 last weekend, on the table.

Ackland is not complaining, however. ”If you want to win [it], you’ve got to win in Australia, that’s the bottom line.

”We’re looking forward to playing in the semi-final. The boys are all keen. We’d play them in a car park if we had to. If we do what we do well, and we stick to what works for us, we’ll be very hard to beat.”

NRL rookie Carlos Tuimavave will return to the under-20s for their play-off campaign, after making five first-grade appearances at fullback late in the season, because of the absence of the injured Kevin Locke.

Ackland said his presence will be welcomed by the junior Warriors.

”He can take a lot of confidence out of the way he played for first grade,” Ackland said.

”I thought he acquitted himself very well in the games that he played, in a tough situation and playing in a position he hadn’t played in a long time. It’s … good to have him back.”

”I think a lot of teams, at this time of year, are playing guys that have had some first-grade experience. I don’t think there’s such a thing as a secret weapon in the competition because everything’s on film and everything gets watched ad nauseam.”

”[But] he’s a good player and brings a lot of experience to the team. He’s played in two semi-final campaigns, so I’m just hoping he can lift it for us.”

Tuimavave will play at five-eighth for the Junior Warriors today, while Peter Hiku is likely to wear the No.1 jumper.

Twitter – @benstanleyffx

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Canberra to launch Carney blitz

January 10th, 2019 / / categories: 南京桑拿荤场 /

CANBERRA have signalled their intention to smash the life out of former teammate Todd Carney to limit his influence in today’s elimination final.
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The Sharks match-winner can expect to walk off Canberra Stadium battered and bruised as the Raiders attempt to find a way to contain the brilliant playmaker. Carney has already hurt the Raiders once this season, carving up his former side with a virtuoso display in the round-eight 44-22 flogging in Canberra.

To prevent that happening again, injured Raiders captain Terry Campese warned Carney would be in for a busy afternoon whenever he looked to get into the play. ”If we can shut him down, give him less time and knock him down every time he touches the ball, that will put a lot of pressure on him,” Campese said ”Hopefully he doesn’t have the game like he did last time he was here.

”When you give a guy that kind of confidence during the game, that’s what he builds his game on.”

Carney has a 3-2 record against the Raiders since he was sacked in 2008 for a string of off-field indiscretions, before he also parted ways with the Roosters last year.

He has found a new lease of life with the Sharks, the talented five-eighth establishing himself as the NSW No.6 and guiding the Sharks to the finals for the first time since 2008. Campese caught up with his former halves partner at the Dally M awards in Sydney during the week, Carney more than happy to divulge how he planned to cut the Raiders to pieces. ”Talking to Toddy during the Dally Ms he made it obvious where he will personally attack us – in the forwards,” Campese said. ”He always seems to target our big forwards.

”He’s got good footwork at the line, and when we get a bit tired that’s when he seems to get his hands on the ball and takes us on.”

Campese believed the opening 20 minutes would be a fiery contest as both sets of forwards tried to gain the upper hand. Sharks captain Paul Gallen has challenged his pack to lift its aggression after being outmuscled in recent weeks.

Raiders coach David Furner has backed Sam Williams to withstand the physical intensity of finals football after he was cleared to return from injury for today’s do-or-die semi against Cronulla.

The halfback missed last week’s win over the Warriors in Auckland with a strained trapezius muscle in his left shoulder, but passed a searching examination at a training session yesterday.

Williams has been pivotal in helping the Raiders defy the odds by making the finals without chief playmaker Campese. Furner knows Cronulla’s hard as nails pack will test out Williams in defence, but said he wouldn’t play the 21-year-old unless he was fully fit.

”He’s fine and ticked all the boxes, he’ll be ready to go,” Furner said.

”He’ll be able to handle it, I have no doubt. I think Sammy knows what’s coming his way and previously before missing that [Warriors] game, he’s defended quite well.”

Williams’s developing combination with five-eighth Josh McCrone has risen another level late this season.

Raiders fullback Josh Dugan is also a certain starter after missing the Warriors clash with an ankle injury.

Forwards Joel Thompson [back injury] and Tom Learoyd-Lahrs [hamstring] have also been given the green light.

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All this talk about Tim Sheens facing the chop at the Wests Tigers is beyond me – I still think he is the best coach in the game.
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He’s second to none not only in terms of how he reinvigorates the game, but also the manner in which he keeps up with changes in the game. A great example is how he had the Tigers playing when we won the comp back in 2005. Now everyone plays that way.

If anyone can rebuild the club it’s Tim. He’s been around coaching for such a long time. Even though we didn’t have success this year, I still feel he is the man for the job.

Put it this way, if I was the CEO or on the board of any club, the only reason I’d change the coach would be if there was someone better – I don’t feel there’s anyone better.

The people who say he’s grown stale being at the same club for a long time don’t see what he does with us – every week at training, Tim pulls out something new. We’re practising things that he gives us the confidence to do, like me with flick passes, so that when we’re in a game situation, they’ll come off.

In terms of the respect of the players, on and off the field, he still has it in spades at the Tigers and I don’t see that changing.

He always drums into us that the most talented players don’t make it in the NRL because their attitude is not right. He keeps us on our toes.

We are all disappointed we’re not in the finals. At the start of the year we didn’t expect to be feeling sorry for ourselves at this time of year and I think we owe our fans an apology for the way our season turned out. As players, we expected better.

We have big expectations on ourselves and we not only let ourselves down, but the coach, the club and the fans.

It was the players’ fault. The coach gave us great game plans all season, but our execution let us down. We were way too inconsistent.

We know, deep inside, that we were good enough to make the finals. But the hardest part is the simple fact that we weren’t successful.

A lot of things didn’t go our way, with injuries and Robbie Farah’s mother tragically dying knocking us all around, but we can’t blame anyone but ourselves. It just wasn’t our year. It’s a hard one as we weren’t far off where we wanted to be all year but, in the end, we were so far away.

It’s the usual thing at this time of year for the teams that didn’t make it – you look back at the games you could have or should have won. We lost to Souths in extra time when Greg Inglis kicked a field goal and there was the game a couple of weeks ago against the Dogs which they also won in golden point.

Looking ahead to next year, the good thing for the club out of this season is we’ve unearthed some stars of the future in Aaron Woods, Curtis Sironen and Marika Koroibete.

We’ve also got a few new players coming in. I can’t wait for Braith Anasta to come over from the Roosters, it will be great. I’d be happy if he played halfback and I can go back to five-eighth. I think that’d suit my game and his. I’d have a bit more room to move and he could do a lot of the organising, which is what he’s been doing all his career anyway. His experience in big games will also help us out a lot.

I just want to get on the training field so we get back to where we want to be next year. I know we can be a lot better in 2013 – and I know changing the coach is not the answer.

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Sheikha sets standard at Dapto

January 10th, 2019 / / categories: 南京桑拿荤场 /

With $25,000 on offer to the winner of the Dean Industrial Maiden series at Dapto on September 20, a brace of high-quality youngsters plied their trade in impressive fashion in last Wednesday’s series opening heats.
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Many hopefuls had trialled at the track six days earlier and very slow times were the norm but, on a blustery night, the well-related Sheikha cleared the cobwebs from clock watchers in heat one.

A three-quarter sister to High Earner, Sheikha was poorly away from box 5 but secured an inside run to the first turn and, after wresting the lead from Kay Tee Perry with 150 metres to run, went on to score by two lengths in 30.02 seconds. The standard had been set.

Only two races later, Kellmatt’s Melody overcame difficulties to gun down the speedy Paua To Punish in 30.15. Twenty minutes on and it was Dark Assassin’s turn.

A son of 2010 National Futurity and Ladies Bracelet winner Daydream, Dark Assassin showed high speed in his 29.91 s offering, registering best-of-the-night sections of 5.36 s and 17.17 s on the way to potting almost 12 lengths between himself and runner-up Bit Kool.

But the fireworks were far from over. Jason Magri’s Rebel Vigilante (Bombastic Shiraz – Ferly Gain) finished with gusto to take heat six in 29.98 s while his kennelmate Stuzzichino (Bit Chili – Winsome Silver) showed speed to lead from box 5 and register 29.95 s.

Heat eight went to Tubba The Weapon in a tight decision over Les Ogden in 30.15s while Fancy Choice’s 30.23 offering in heat 10 made secured trainer Anthony Azzopardi a third runner in Thursday’s semi-final round.

Meanwhile, at Ipswich on Friday, the ill-fated High Earner sired the winner of the Ipswich Futurity (Velocity High) and his son, Alex The Great, dead-heated with Never Tell in the final.

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Sheens free to double up

January 10th, 2019 / / categories: 南京桑拿荤场 /

WESTS TIGERS boss Stephen Humphreys is adamant there will be no pressure on Tim Sheens to give up his Australian coaching commitments to focus solely on club duties.
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The coaching merry-go-round took another turn during the week with Trent Robinson appointed to replace sacked Roosters coach Brian Smith. That leaves the Warriors job vacant, with Sheens linked to the post despite being under contract until the end of 2014.

Sheens is the most experienced coach in NRL history, winning four premierships in a career spanning 28 years. However, the last of those titles was seven years ago with the Tigers and his teams have only made the play-offs three times in the past 15 years. The club was under pressure to perform after entering the season as premiership favourites but failed to qualify for the finals. While there have been mitigating circumstances – key players Robbie Farah, Keith Galloway, Gareth Ellis and several others spent stints in the casualty ward – the pressure is growing after another season ended in disappointment.

Coaches under similar pressure have given up their representative roles in recent years – Neil Henry stepped away from the Maroons and David Furner gave up assisting Sheens at the Kangaroos last year, although he has returned to the national set-up. Humphreys said Sheens won’t be forced to follow suit.

”We think Tim coaching the Australian side brings more positives than it does negatives,” Humphreys said. ”The schedule is more manageable these days now with a stand-alone Test during the year against New Zealand. That’s no issue and the rest of it is at the end of the year, so it’s hardly a distraction. Tim’s the kind of guy who works an enormous amount of hours and it won’t detract from what he’s doing with us.”

According to a market framed by Betstar, sacked Eels mentor Stephen Kearney is the $2.50 favourite to take over at the Warriors, ahead of David Kidwell ($4.75) and Sheens ($5).

The Warriors are in the market for a new coach after recently parting ways with Brian McClennan, who was contracted until the end of 2013.

While the Roosters have resolved their head coaching future, Robinson will be under immediate pressure. The club has parted company early with their last five coaches – Smith, Brad Fittler, Chris Anderson, Ricky Stuart and Graham Murray. One of them, dual-premiership winner Anderson, warned Robinson would be next if he didn’t perform immediately.

”They don’t muck about, there is no superannuation in the coaching jobs there,” Anderson said. ”At Eastern Suburbs they are ruthless in the fact they want success and they’re not prepared to wait for it. If you can’t give it to them, they’ll get someone else. I feel for any coach getting the sack, it’s not a good time for anyone. We rely on our results and they’re not there – especially when you go to a place like Easts – you don’t get much time to create what you want to create. It’s a warning for anyone who goes there. Results are the only thing you’re going to be judged by.”

Assistant coach Matthew Elliott said he felt for Smith, the man who brought him to Bondi Junction. He was unsure how the development would affect his future. ”I’ve got a contract for next year, but that’s all I can tell you at the moment,” he said.

Roosters CEO Steve Noyce said the club had yet to finalise its coaching structure, including Robinson’s assistants.

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Defied death … Tulloch, ridden by Roy Higgins.The Tulloch strain, as well as the curse, raged in Tullmax. Probably the greatest horse of our time, Tulloch was a dud at stud. Few of his offspring showed the attributes – a little of the aristocrat, brute force and courage – that made Tulloch a champion.
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Trainer Tommy Smith reckoned he was retired to a Bathurst sheep property that ”wouldn’t sustain a rabbit”. Of course, Tulloch nearly died with a scouring affliction and missed two years of racing. Only the genius of super vet Percy Sykes, at first with a tincture of opium, saved him. While Smith maintained he was never the same following that illness, Tulloch still won 14 more races.

Tulloch retired in 1962 but it wasn’t until nearly 20 years that Tullmax, a far cry from Tulloch Lodge and Royal Randwick, surfaced in most unlikely circumstances. By Prince Max, Tullmax was out of Tullrigo, a Tulloch mare. When he arrived at Trevor Doulman’s Molong stables after being knocked back by other trainers, Tullmax had plenty in common with Tulloch at his lowest ebb.

”I remember him coming off the float, just bones, the float was a mess, he was scouring so badly,” Joan Giffen, wife of Doulman, recalled last week from Molong, which she described as still a ”lovely town with lovely people, and not going backwards”.

Tullmax couldn’t be left at the stables because it was feared he would contaminate other horses, so he was sent to Jack Cantrill’s property near Orange which had an apple orchard. ”When Trevor took him out there, ‘Dexter’, a worker, shouted ‘we’d better start digging today because he’ll be dead tomorrow.”’ Tulloch was also fed tormented apples with a special clay. It proved successful for Tullmax, the bag of bones, which made his racing debut for his new owners at seven and won 14 out of his first 17 starts. Doulman worked at the Molong post office and Tullmax was trained earlier on the Molong golf course, once a racetrack.

”After being very patient Trevor decided to give him a bit of hit-out and couldn’t believe the time he ran,” Giffen said, but her timing system didn’t entail the distance between the third and eighth green. ”Hit the button on the stopwatch at a certain point and stop it at the winning post.”

Tullmax created a furore in Sydney and Herald chief of staff Peter Bowers, a wizard news hound, sent Bert Lillye and a photographer in an office car to capture the Molong action. Ken Sutcliffe and his photographer arrived from another outfit and Giffen gave them morning tea. ”Ken told me he had been a barber in Mudgee,” Giffen said. Tullmax went on to win races in town, including the weight-for-age George Main Stakes, a group 1 mile at Randwick, after being a certainty beaten in the Epsom, says Allan Williams, the MP for Hawkesbury.

”My dad, the late Allen Williams, was Trevor’s cousin and whenever he had one smart enough to win in town, which he regularly did, he would bring it to our place at Box Hill, days prior to the race, to ensure as little travel fatigue as possible for the horse on race day,” Williams said.

”Horses were their lives and Trevor obtained his trainer’s licence when still a teenager. My father followed his chosen career in the boxing ring, winning the Australian and South Pacific heavyweight title belts in the 1950s, later obtaining his own trainer’s licence when the boxing career finished. Trevor and dad would discuss his work pattern over the phone and ensure a good supply of Molong water was available for him to drink, together with his special diet. Nothing was left to chance with kegs of water and his feed from home trucked over the mountains to ensure even the slightest chance of a recurrence of the problem being averted.”

Alas, the gelding had a bleeding attack in the Newcastle Newmarket and after his three-month break was favourite for a Sydney race when disaster struck. ”Reg Paine’s son from Cowra, Neil, an apprentice, was to ride him but after a trot getting ready for the race he came back with a trickle of blood and Trevor ended his career. ”Everyone said ‘why did you do that?”’

But Doulman wasn’t going to risk a young apprentice. ”If Max fell I’ve got to live with it and he’s given us more than we expected. We can’t race him if he’s not well,” the trainer said.

Since it was his second bleeding attack, Tullmax was barred for life in Australia. The gelding returned to Jack Cantrill’s apple orchard. He lived until he was 29. Doulman, 62, died 16 years ago. ”It’s a stressful game,” Giffen said.

Once the trainer gave his wife cause for concern when he went to a presentation for Tullmax. He was wearing a shirt, frayed at the collar and not the special one laid out by her for the occasion. Why? ”I don’t want anybody thinking I’m getting too flash because of Max,” he replied.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.